EXPEDITION TIME
STAY UPDATED | NEWS ALERTS | YOU REPORT | ADVERTISE
  REGISTER!
 
   
JAXA (the Japanese Space Agency) is first up to develop and launch an SSP satellite. Snapshot of conference slide by ExWeb (click to enlage).
Power beamed straight to deployed forward units would ease soldiers packs. Snapshot of conference slide by ExWeb (click to enlarge).
Rooms were bigger and audiences were larger than last. This time around, Boeing was in place; so was the Canadian Space Agency and NASA. Snapshot of conference slide by ExWeb (click to enlarge).
Rooms were bigger and audiences were larger than last. This time around, Boeing was in place; so was Raytheon, the Canadian Space Agency, and NASA. Snapshot of conference slide by ExWeb (click to enlarge).
Advocates such as Dr Feng Hsu (Lead Engineer, Frontier Space Missions, NASA GSFC) said that the technology would offer higher power/unit land area than other renewables. Image by ExplorersWeb (click to enlarge).
Some of the pioneers...
...and their growing audience. Images by ExplorersWeb (click to enlarge).
Two years ago, Dr Nobuyuki Kaya, researcher in Radio Engineering, Geophysics and Plasma Physics in Japan took a red eye to US to show his shoestring experiment with Space Solar Power. Insert image of Kaya over a model of a Trestle space solar power unit - an autonomous assembly by teams of coordinated robots funded by a NSF/NASA/EPRI program. Dr Kaya's note was moderated by NASA veteran John Mankins who left the agency due to his disagreement with NASA's policy on solar power researc..

ExWeb 2009 Space report, part 3 - Manna from Heaven: Space Solar Power

Posted: Sep 17, 2009 11:03 pm EDT

SUBSCRIBER CONTENT PREVIEW
FOR FULL STORY: LOGIN OR SUBSCRIBE NOW - UP TO 3 MONTHS FREE

(Pythom.com/Tina Sjogren) Although gas prices didn't take us for the same big ride this summer compared to last, fact remains that we are running out of juice. Two thirds of the current oil producers can't increase production anymore - while demand is skyrocketing - mainly in fast-growing China. The oil that's left is a dirty, clammy concoction - almost impossible to refine at a reasonable cost anymore. Man made global warming or not, we want to go green. At least until we start to count on it and speakers at this year's...

CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE READING