Allie Pepper posted a summit account on May 15 from Manaslu packed with stunning pictures. The peak had around 15 summiteers, with most climbers using supplementary oxygen. Iranian Jafar Naseri fell to his death on descent.
Image by Allie Pepper courtesy www.alliepepper.com, SOURCE
There were no summits on Shishapangma.
courtesy 2012 Project Himalaya Shishapangma, SOURCE
Mario Panzeri broke 14 eight thousanders with no oxygen on Dhaulagiri. Just five summiteers were reported from the peak.
Only Annapurna legend Peter Hamor managed Kanchenjunga. No O2.
Image by Peter Hamor courtesy Peter Hamor, SOURCE
Incredibly, almost all climbers escaped Annapurna unscathed. The summit count is not clear.
Image by Tunc Findik courtesy Tunc Findik
Himalaya roundup: Manaslu, Dhaula, Shisha, Cho Oyu, Anna

Posted: May 23, 2012 06:47 am EDT
(Newsdesk) The undisputed drama queen on this side of Himalaya, Mount Everest will get the last word again this season. Without doubt, Annapurna kicked it off. A quick check shows little movement on the other 8000er peaks right now.

Last update from Manaslu was Aussie She'la Allie Pepper who posted a summit account on May 15 packed with pictures. Her story echoes Guy's earlier Manaslu debrief "To the real top".

Manaslu became one of the most successful 8000 meter peaks. Led by Adventure Consultants, the climb resulted in around 15 summits. German sky-skiers Luis Stitzinger and Ali Von Melle turned back and sadly, Iranian Jafar Naseri reportedly fell descending to lower camps and is presumed dead.

There were no summits on Shishapangma. Three Spaniards were close but not close enough. The climb almost sparked a typical Shishapangma true summit debate until Juanito Oiarzabal made clear that theirs had not been the true top. Other teams on the peak (Project Himalaya, Amical) last posted around May 15, holding for summit push. Mark Hose said lack of climbers on the mountain and wind patterns would not allow him the opportunity of getting above camp I and has left. Sophie Denis (planning to climb six peaks above 8,000 meters in 2012) returned to US early due to illness.

On Dhaulagiri Mario Panzeri broke 14 eight thousanders with no oxygen. The success came only after two previous attempts loaded with snow. The final climb took seventeen hours in cold winds and the two Italians (Mario and Giampaolo Corona) didn't make the top until 6 pm. With them was Dawa Sherpa and two Czech climbers. 



Many other climbers reportedly gave up on the ridge at 7,500 meters, turned back by the icy gale. Marco Confortola, whose fingers were amputated after frostbite he suffered on K2 in 2008 reportedly gave up his ascent at that altitude due to cold feet. 



With his success, Panzeri became the 27th climber in the world to complete al the 14, 8000ers, and only the 16th to do so without supplementary oxygen.

No more word on Hiro Takeuchi (13 eight thousanders), American Ryan Waters and Norwegian Cecilie Skog.

Meanwhile on Kanchenjunga a bunch of climbers including Spanish Egocheaga/Ramos and Italian couple Meroi/Benet were to share the works on the mountain.

In the end, the only word about success had Slovak shotgun climber Peter Hamor on top. His climbing partner Romanian Horia Colibasanu turned back. The first mountaineer from Slovakia, Peter Hamor has now reached summits of nine 8000ers. Starting on Everest in 1998, in 2010 Peter Hamor summited Annapurna for a second time (via the North Face).

It's been a wild season on Annapurna with massive avalanches this Himalaya spring. The peak became lucky 13 for Czech climber Radek Jaros who said the climb was his hardest yet (all without oxygen). Radek went with climbing partner Jan Travnicek (in his 3rd 8000er). The conditions were terrible and many turned back to C3 due to avalanches and snow.

ExWeb community also reported that Azim Ghaychisaz from Iran, and Spanish Sechu Lopez and Oscar Cadiach (K2 Magic line) topped out.

The Hungarian team thanked Azim for helping in the search for Tibor Horvath, believed swept away and buried by an ice avalanche that ripped the lower part of the fixed ropes above camp 2. Other remarkable tales form the mountain: Canadian Don Bowie's two part report "The day the mountain fell" illustrated by incredible pictures shot by Tunc Findik and Hungarian amputee climber Zsolt Eross.

An earlier summit bid including a total of twelve people, all using bottled oxygen, remains unverified. Carlos Soria, Tente Lagunilla and their 4 Sherpas finally aborted their second summit push citing "enormous amount of snow" between camp 2 and 3, bringing the risk of avalanche "to the extreme".

On Cho Oyu, climbing in heavy weather AMS took its toll on the young Indian mountaineer Arjun Vajpai. Arjun suffered AMS at Camp 2 (7,200m/23,600ft) on his summit push. After weather further deteriorated all climbers had to scramble back to ABC. It's not over yet. SummitClimb are holding for another try.

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