At 67 years old, Pavel Rezvoy, a geologist from Ukraine, is the oldest rower in the history of ocean rowing. Pavel rowed the Atlantic E-W in ORSARR 2004. It took him 61 days, but that row wasnt enough for Pavel. He continued on from Barbados, arriving in Cuba on June 9th, 2004. Still not content, he continued rowing, leaving Cuba for Jamaica on June 18th. Two days later Pavel arrived in Jamaica on June 20th, 2004. Image of Pavel chatting away with a Jamaica fisherman courtesy of Oceanrowing.co..
Pavel says it was much harder than his Atlantic row last year even though the distance was roughly the same. The Indian Ocean has only been rowed three times - by Simon Chalk, Anders Svedlund and Pavel Rezvoy (the longest distance in the shortest time). Image courtesy of ORS.
Grandpa did it again! Pavel Rezvoy, 67, rowed longest distance in shortest time across Indian Ocean

Posted: Nov 14, 2005 05:24 am EST
At 67 years old, Pavel Rezvoy, a geologist from Ukraine, is the oldest rower in the history of ocean rowing. When he, after 62 days, crossed the finish line in Barbados, he arrived as number two of the solo class in ORSARR 2004, only 2,5 days after the 23 years old winner.

But then grandpa refused to go home: -"There is nothing to do in Ukraine for senior citizens", he said; left Barbados and rowed to Cuba. That was last year. So what's Pavel up to these days? Well, a few days back, at 4.00 GMT November 9, Pavel was going through Custom formalities in Mahe, Seychelles. How he got there? He rowed, of course!

Much harder than the Atlantic row

The Indian Ocean is considered one of the toughest rows due to high winds and high waves. Pavel says it was much harder than his Atlantic row last year even though the distance was roughly the same.

The Indian Ocean has only been rowed two times before - by Simon Chalk (not a true land to land crossing) and Anders Svedlund. Simon Chalk (GB) rowed for 107 days in 2003, from Kalbarri (Western Australia) to the Longitude of Rafael Island - a distance of 4027 km. Anders Swedlund (Sw) rowed 64 days in 1971, from Kalbarri (Western Australia) to a beach near Diego Suarez, Madagascar - a distance of 4313 km.

The fastest as well as the longest

Pavel Rezvoy took over Teddys row at Cocos Islands, Keeling Islands, off the coast of Australia and landed outside Mahé, Seychelles - a total distance of 4538 km. He got there only after 57 days. It is not clear yet where exactly Pavel landed, but the Ocean Rowing Society writes that Pavel is the second person ever to do a complete row across the Indian Ocean - land to land. His row is both the fastest as well as the longest Pacific row.

Theodore Rezvoy attempted to row the Indian Ocean, from Carnavorn, WA, Australia to Madagascar. Teddy was making great progress but sadly had to end his row due to previous injuries and made port at Cocos Island, Keeling Islands, some 1,200 miles and 20 days into his row. He made an offer to his father to continue the row and Pavel accepted. The Rezvoy name is at stake, I will finish the row stated Pavel to the Ocean Rowing Society.

At age 67. Pavel is the oldest (competitive) rower out on the oceans, but that doesnt seem to slow him down any. An accomplished rower, Pavel rowed the Atlantic E-W in ORSARR 2004. It took him 61 days, but that row wasnt enough for Pavel. He continued on from Barbados, arriving in Cuba on June 9th, 2004. Still not content, he continued rowing, leaving Cuba for Jamaica on June 18th. Two days later Pavel arrived in Jamaica on June 20th, 2004.

Explorerweb honored Pavel as one of the top adventurers of 2004.

The Indian Ocean has been rowed solo/unsupported only twice, first in 1971 by Anders Svedlund. It took the Swedish rower 64 days to complete the journey aboard Roslagena. In 2003 Brit Simon Chalk completed the solo/unsupported row in 107 days. There have been 5 other unsuccessful attempts to conquer this particular route, by both pairs and solo rowers.






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