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There were some huge crevasses [at the west coast of the Ice Cap], and I [Ben] went through one up to my waste just after we roped up about 12 miles away from Point 660 (click to enlarge)
Image by David Paabo courtesy Ben Thackwray, SOURCE
Be prepared for a long day making your way through the last 9-10 miles. Be prepared to have to back track and for times where you may have to take the pulks and skis off and take a running jump across some melt water rivers, but don't take any unnecessary risks. (click to enlarge)
Image by David Paabo courtesy Ben Thackwray, SOURCE
"We went pretty light weight, the pulks at the start were 45 kg each and we were pretty organized so could set up camp, cook, eat and be asleep in 45 minutes." Reaching Point 660 (click to enlarge)
courtesy Ben Thackwray, SOURCE
"We complement each other really well too, we are particularly good at different things." (click to enlarge)
Image by Ian Couch courtesy Ben Thackwray, SOURCE

ExWeb interview with Ian Couch and Ben Thackwray (part 1): Teamwork comes down to a deep level of respect and trust

Posted: May 25, 2010 08:01 pm EDT

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The two Brits made two attempts to break the speed record along the horizontal crossing of the Greenland Ice Cap. During the expeditions they encountered serious frostbite (on their first attempt), polar bears, melt water rivers, crevasses and canyons. Ian and Ben talked to ExplorersWeb about their experiences and shared what they have learned on the Ice Cap, and tell about their future plans.ExWebs Correne Coetzer caught up with them in England. ExplorersWeb: This Spring many teams reported warm weather and melt water at...

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