Last week brought cool updates from extreme treks and sea voyages around the world.
courtesy Christian Bodegren, SOURCE
ExplorersWeb Week in Review

Posted: Feb 15, 2010 02:47 am EST
Since Alison Hargreaves, no other female Himalayan climber has opted to raise children between expeditions and the entire issue remains a red-hot taboo. Last week, ExplorersWeb threw in the grenade and asked women high altitude mountaineers for their opinions. The results are an interesting study of humans both in thin air and down the valleys.

In other news: American speed climber Chad Kellogg debriefed his under-the-radar solo on Aconcagua's wild south face and there were some cool updates from extreme treks and sea voyages around the world.

ExWeb special: Himalaya - no place for mothers? Male Himalayan climbers often have kids but female mountaineers are rarely mothers. Moreover, men leaving their family for risky exploration are admired while women doing the same thing are criticized. Why is that? Last week, ExWeb ran a series special on the issue.

ExWeb special, part 2: Himalaya - perfect place for a date? In part 1 we covered Alison Heargraves' fight for her right to climb as a mother. Her kids and marriage suffered critics said, but these are two separate issues scientists have found. In fact, a date in Himalaya could prove the best recipe for a life-long relationship and part 2 covered Himalayan marriages.

ExWeb special, final: Women in Himalaya - Amazons fighting the Dark Ages According to records, avid female Himalaya climbers tend to delay childbirth, if they have kids at all. Male climbers instead just keep climbing, kids or not. In the final part of the series, female mountaineers told ExplorersWeb what they think about that.

American Chad Kellogg solos Aconcagua's wild south face Forty-two hours spent on the face, pure alpine style and no one around. "The Medicine Buddha" on Aconcagua's south face was carved by American speed climber Chad Kellogg in a very ambitious preparation for Everest this spring.

Green Traveler in Indian Terrorism Trial Andy Pag, who is attempting to drive around the world in a vegetable oil powered bus, was arrested and imprisoned in India on suspicion of terrorism, because he was in possession of a satellite phone without a permit. Pags arrest in Pushkar, Rajasthan over a month ago on January 11, was followed by 100 officers sweeping through the town searching for evidence of terrorist connections to the green adventurer, who has previously driven a chocolate-powered lorry to Timbuktu. Pag, currently freed on bail, if convicted could be sentenced to more time in Ajmer prison where inmates sleep on cold stone floors and have limited access to hygiene facilities.

Phoenicia update: Re-routing the pirate waters to the Cape of Good Hope The Phoenicia Ship Expedition is nearing the halfway mark of their circumnavigation of Africa in a replica of a 600 BC Phoenician ship. They re-routed away from possible Tanzania pirates and are on their way to one of the hardest and most exciting stretches of their expedition, the Cape of Good Hope.

Tower, glider - and parachute-equipped plane in Boulder crash Three people died in Colorado last Saturday after a Cirrus CR20 plane - equipped with an emergency parachute - clipped the towline of a Piper Pawnee pulling a glider. The two planes crashed while the glider pilot managed to cut loose, landing safely with his passengers.

ExWeb interview with Linda Beilharz, Each icecap has its own challenges A few years ago Linda Beilharz started exploring the main ice fields of the world. She is now on her way to ski from Canada to the North Pole with husband Rob Rigato and guide Sarah McNair-Landry. Linda spoke to ExWeb about her North Pole expectations and the Southern Patagonia Icecap.

Hayley Shephards solo sea kayak around South Georgia Island in the balance Hayley Shepard plans to solo sea kayak around South Georgia Island, a Sub-Antarctic Island. While crossing the Drake Passage in her support vessel from Ushuaia to get South Georgia, a storm hit them and injured the Captain. They had to divert to the Falkland Islands and Hayley is now considering her options.

Shaun Quincy update: Seven days in a 2m x 1m box Shaun who is rowing from Australia to New Zealand has been out on the Tasman for 21 days. Rough weather kept him locked-up in his cabin until last week when he jumped overboard to scrub the hull from barnacles, cautiously due to shark sightings.

Icetrek Expeditions Flexi ski bindings: Plateau release Icetrek Expeditions has released its third model of Flexi ski binding - the Plateau.Plateau's webbing and buckle strap system can be adjusted to suit any footwear, from an ultra-wide winter boot like Baffin's Polar series to a running shoe, Icetreks Eric Philips told ExplorersWeb.

Teen girls sail around-the-world update: Jessica knocked down and Abby starting a second time One tough cookie reads the surprise T-shirt that her mum has put in her food bag she opened after the gale force winds. Jessica Watson deserves to wear it after being knocked down 4 times. Abby Sunderlands determination showed when she started off for a second time after mechanical problems.

Ice Warrior postpones the North Pole of Inaccessibility Explorer Jim McNeill has postponed his team's quest for the Northern Pole of Inaccessibility quoting satellite images reportedly showing slower Arctic ice growth without the normal winter freeze. "The risks of early failure, of cold injury and of needing to be rescued are too high," stated the press release.

Desert update: No Libya camel crossing for Christian Bodegren; and Ripley Davenports Mongolia trailer Christian Bodgren who is currently crossing the Sahara arrived from Egypt in Libya only to find that his dream to cross Libya on camel is in reality something different. Ripley Davenport who is planning a Mongolia crossing is testing his expedition trailer; hauling 230 kg.

Read these stories - and more! - at ExplorersWeb.com.

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