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Since we last heard from the Vogel Family their lives on the road have been dominated by the nasty Patagonian wind. And, as seems to be the rule for every cyclist touring the world, there´s always a headwind. Never a tailwind. But to the amazement of the family, one day they had 71 km/hour tailwind.
Image by Vogel Family courtesy Vogel Family, SOURCE
Since we heard from the Vogel Family last October, they have gone through extreme heat, rain, howling winds and more accidents.
Image by Vogel Family courtesy Vogel Family, SOURCE
Resting at a road side café in Patagonia....
Image by Vogel Family courtesy Vogel Family, SOURCE
Nancy Vogel: "My challenge for myself when I get back home is to banish the cants. Cant will no longer be used in our home well find a way to make them cans. They may end up being cans of a vile, foul-smelling soup, but only then will we truly deem them cants. Until then, we can."
Image by Vogel Family courtesy Vogel Family, SOURCE

The Vogel Family, closing in on The End of The World

Posted: Feb 20, 2011 10:13 am EST
(By Mikael Strandberg) The last time we heard from the intrepid Vogel Family, back in the middle of October 2010, Nancy Vogel was suffering from pneumonia. She was at that stage of their Alaska to Argentina trip extremely worried. She had doubts if the family consisting of two grown ups and their twins, Daryl and Davy, ever would reach their final goal, Ushuaia, at the end of the American continent. Four months later they´re slowly closing in on their goal. But, as always, they have to fight for it.

Disaster strikes again

"Disaster only takes a split second so fast. Way too fast" , Nancy writes on their blog; "We raced toward to Fitz Roy, hoping to get there before the rain started falling more heavily it was only a light drizzle at that point. The headwind had eased up when the rain began, so we took off barreling down the road trying to reach shelter. And then it happened. A truck whizzed past John tried to get over onto the shoulder His wheel caught on the edge of the pavement The tandem went down. BAM! They crashed into the gravel shoulder of the road."

The casualties?

Johns arm is pretty seriously scraped a couple of deep gashes where some pebbles made contact. And his brake/shifter lever disintegrated. Fortunately, Daryl was completely unharmed.

A howling tailwind

Since we last heard from the Vogel Family their lives on the road have been dominated by the nasty Patagonian wind, which never seems to take a break. And, as seems to be the rule for every cyclist touring the world, there´s always a headwind. Never a tailwind. But to the amazement of the family, one day they had 71 km/hour tailwind.Nancy writes:

"We never see speeds like this: for most of the day, we were cruising at about 30 or 31 kph - couldnt possibly spare a hand on the handlebars to take a pic when we were going really fast! Our overall average for the day ended up being 21kph!"

Soon going home

The family has cycled 26 582 kilometers to date since they left Alaska June the 8th 2008. Less than 1200 remaining. They´re kind of getting prepared in mind to go home. Nancy concludes on her blog:

"My challenge for myself when I get back home is to banish the cants. Cant will no longer be used in our home well find a way to make them cans. They may end up being cans of a vile, foul-smelling soup, but only then will we truly deem them cants. Until then, we can."

An American family of four is on a two and a half year cycle journey from Alaska to Argentina traversing the Pan-American Highway. The Vogels, mother Nancy, father John and their 10-year old twin boys Davy and Daryl started on June 8, 2008 and are currently in southern Peru in the desert.

The four are no strangers to bicycle touring. In 2006-07, they completed a 12-month, 9300-mile trek around the USA and Mexico.

#Trek #World