They did it: Denis and Serguey SUMMIT Broad Peak through a new route!

Posted: Jul 25, 2005 10:13 am EDT

"We're going down through the normal route, currently at 7700 - we reached the top at 11:30 am, reported Kazakh Denis Urubko and Serguey Samoilov to RussianClimb.com earlier today.

<b>New route in alpine style</b>

They have climbed Broad Peak through a new route on the South West face in alpine style! Denis Urubko and Serguey Samoilov started their push from 5100m on the SW face on July, 19th. The climb took them six days (and 5 bivouacs) on the wall, in very tough conditions and serious difficulties.<cutoff>

Yesterday, the climbers reported on strong wind, no visibility, very deep snow with avalanches and dangerous rock sections. They spent the night at 7800m.

Hopefully, the climbers will reach BC in time to celebrate Denis' birthday on Friday.

<b>News confirmed from BC</b>

Polish Piotr Pustelnik, currently in Broad's BC, confirmed Denis and Serguey's feat:

"Denis Urubko and Sergey Samoylov have completed a new route from Concordia to Broad Peak Summit. They made 5 bivouacs in 6 days. Now they are coming back to Base Camp"

The Iranian climbers who claim to have summited BP last Thursday had also planned to climb via a new route on the SW Face - but eventually switched to the normal route.

<i>The Kazakh aces Denis Urubko and Sergey Samoilov have completed a new route on Broads SW face in Alpine style.

Denis Urubko is considered one of the top climbers today. Last year, he opened a new route on the North Face of Baruntse together with Simone Moro, and made a night summit on Annapurna in bad weather conditions. Denis has summited nine 8000ers. He summitted BP already on July 18, 2003, through the normal route. He and Ed Viesturs carried out a nighttime rescue of Jean-Christophe Lafaille when he suffered from pulmonary problems after summiting and could not descend on his own.

Denis has done many summits, but also sacrificed summits to help climbers in trouble, some of whom he had never met before. He doesnt have all the 8000ers he could have, but instead has earned unanimous respect from the climbing community.

Named for its great expanse and bulk, the triple crested Broad Peak was scaled for the first time on June 9, 1957 by Hermann Buhl, Kurt Diemberger, Marcus Schmuck and Fritz Wintersteller.
With a route considered less technically challenging, Broad Peak has a reputation of being among the easiest of the 8000 meter peaks. But statistics are signaling a more dangerous mountain than its reputation.

Less than 300 climbers have summited Broad Peak. The summit/ fatality rate is around 7%, pretty close to Everest 9%.

Interesting enough however, comparing statistics gives at hand that Broad Peak has become more dangerous to climb! Up to 1990 the Broad Peak fatality rate is 5%, but from 1990 until last year the rate jumped to 8.6 %, or close to twice of the modern Everest fatality rate (4.4%).

Whilst the old Everest risk was 37% and BP only 5%, the giants now have switched places with Everest on 4.4% and BP on 8.6% in the last decade. An indication to climbers not to take Broad Peak lightly.

At 8,051m, Broad Peak is number 12 on the list of the fourteen 8,000m peaks, and is the third highest in the Karakoram range. It is located in Pakistan on the upper reaches of the Baltoro glacier, the main access route to the mountains which cuts through the center of the Karakoram range.</i>

#Mountaineering #feature



The new route opened by Denis and Serguey on Borad Peak's SW face. The climbers started their summit push in alpine style from 5100m on July, 18th. Image courtesy of Russianclimb.com.
Denis Urubko last year in Annapurna's BC. The Kazakh is considered one of the top climbers today. Denis has climbed 9 8000ers, but also sacrificed summits to help climbers in trouble, some of whom he had never met before. He had already summited BP back in 2003 through the normal route. Image courtesy of Denis Urubko.
Serguey and the new Kazakhstan climbing star - Svetlana Sharipova. Image courtesy of RussianClimb.com.




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