Henk de Velde to sail off on never-ending voyage

Posted: Sep 29, 2007 03:45 am EDT

(TheOceans.net) Future space explorers will have to be ready to leave Earth and never return. Who would do something like that? Folks like Henk de Velde would.

The impossible journey flashback

September 3, 2004 disaster struck the Campina: "Ice floes clashed against each other constantly with a power enough to crack my ship. Around 4 hours before darkness fell, the ice berg that we had been anchored to broke. We maneuvered Campina to a larger ice berg, between the floes."

"Then the flow twisted and a heavy iceberg pressed the boat against the wall of ice. We were crooked 10 degrees. The iceberg pressed the boat onto underwater ice. I heard an enormous cracking. We tied her up with long lines to the ice." Henk and his ice lots Boris, 72, were stuck in the ice wall of the Laptev sea.

Imagine leaving everything behind, for ever

The Northwest Passage proved impossible indeed, but Henk De Velde's "Impossible Journey" won the 2004 ExWeb awards for his battle to the bitter end.

Now Henk is setting out for a truly different expedition. "The never-ending voyage" will do exactly that - never end. Imagine leaving your home, country, friends and family for ever - that's what Henk has decided to do. Stay tuned for ExWeb's interview with the great explorer.

Henk de Velde has previously sailed around the world four times, three times non-stop and solo. The first trip lasted between 1978 and 1985 so Henk is known to take his time when out exploring. "The reason for traveling like this is to experience new things and enjoy life to the fullest," Henk said. After returning home from his "Impossible Journey" in 2004 - a sail attempt around the world via the "impossible" Northern seaway along the North East Passage above and along Siberia, Alaska, Cape Horn and Antarctica - Henk has decided to go back out there - and stay.
#Oceans


"We were crooked 10 degrees. The iceberg pressed the boat onto underwater ice." The Northwest passage proved impossible indeed, but Henk De Velde's Impossible Journey won the 2004 ExWeb awards for his battle to the bitter end. Image courtesy of Henk de Velde.


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